places in Punjab

Qila Mubarak

Qila Mubarak

Patiala Patiala Punjab

A fine example of the Sikh architecture, the Qila Mubarak filled in as the living arrangement for the Royal Palace of Patiala. The castle complex is spread over a region of 10 sections of land and is situated in the focal point of the city. The castle contains an exhibition hall and a craftsmanship display which includes the Patiala sketches that delineate different scenes from the Hindu mythology.

Sheesh Mahal

Sheesh Mahal

Patiala Patiala Punjab

Situated at the old Moti Bag royal residence, the Sheesh mahal or the castle of mirrors was constructed in the nineteenth century. The Sheesh Mahal is enhanced with an immense number of frescoes. The construction of the Sheesh Mahal was done under the Maharaja Narinder Singh.

Akal Takht Amritsar

Akal Takht Amritsar

Amritsar Amritsar Punjab

Akal Takht, (Punjabi: "Position of the royalty of the Timeless One") the central focal point of religious specialist of Sikhism. It is situated in the city of Amritsar in Punjab state, northwestern India. Comparable seats of expert (tickets) are located at Anandpur and Talwandi Sabo (close Bathinda) in Punjab, Patna in Bihar state, and Nanded in Maharashtra state. The Akal Takht is a piece of the complex of religious structures fixated on the Harmandir Sahib, or Golden Temple, the critical Sikh place of love. It is arranged just past a large portal at the passage to the highway over the tank (pool) that prompts the Golden Temple. The building was severely harmed amid the ambush on the Golden Temple by the Indian armed force in June 1984. It was accordingly revamped.

 

The Heritage Walk

The Heritage Walk

Amritsar Amritsar Punjab

The Heritage Walk of Amritsar, which was propelled on September 27, 2011, by a pastor of tourism Hira Singh Gabria and neighbourhood MP Navjot Sidhu under the Punjab Heritage and Tourism Promotion Board (PHTPB), has lost its appeal.

jallianwala baghh

jallianwala baghh

Amritsar Amritsar Punjab

Jallianwala Bagh is an open garden in Amritsar in the Punjab territory of India. Houses a remembrance of national significance, built up in 1951 by the Government of India, to honour the slaughter of serene celebrators including unarmed ladies and kids by British involving powers, on the event of the Punjabi New Year on 13 April 1919 in the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre. Pioneer British Raj sources recognised 379 fatalities and evaluated 1100 wounded. Civil Surgeon Dr Smith showed that there were 1,526 casualties. The official figures of deaths are obscure, yet are probably going to be commonly higher than the correct value of 379.